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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,131 (some duplicates have been removed)
and start that community education process before you actively engage the neighborhoods. i wonder if there's a two year budget that could dovetail that. i'm open to the number of variances. how it at least has been done in my district. so with that i'd like to turn it over to ms. brown >> thank you supervisor chu. i also want to thank supervisor avalos and wiener for raising some points. i do want to add i think to start you tell in kind of piggy bacon some of the supervisors comments. there's a lot about pb on the issues you raised. and the two ways are to number one design the process that inequity issues are prioritized and number it to allocating the resources to make sure it's implemented correctly. i want to say that out front. i wanted to start out with a short video a new video that our organization just is finishing up production on about pb and kind of to bring more of a human face to this and then get to my power presentation >> come out and vote and decide - >> is the - try to communities and you pay taxes and come out and vote and decide how our tax dollars get spent. >>
fund for educational purposes. my i hear a motion and a second please. i so move. second >> thank you. is the lady here oh, okay. may i hear a reading of the remedies >> i don't think i can do any more of anything i saw it was the most fantastic thing i've seen in a meeting. commissioners strrpt i will read the recommendation for 2 to 3 programs. i should have been a little bit after. this was exciting, you know, what i mean. the proposed flexible use of categorical program for educational purposes. whereas is 2009, 2010 state budget s b x for chapter four statutes from 2009 and substantially enacted bill 2009 authorizes the school districts chapter schools and county education do use state fivend for the categorical programs under section 46205 for educational purposes and whereas the flexibility to use the categorical programs for any educational purposes is authorizes for the fiscal year 2008, 2009 to the fiscal year neo 13 and fourteen and whereas the condition of the categorical programs fund that maybe used for any educational purposes and as a continue for trar those funds to
shown in any substantial manner by it's really important in educational value. and on this note i want though emphasis that asian museum first and for most is a platform of education whether for kindergarten or adults. so i mention the educational program will have a significant increase year after year. so the next slide i'll talk about the public active where folks have free assess. we provided free access to the public library system and others agencies. and in this particular we're working closely with the summer youth programs to provide kids not only experience about art but to work in the art museum but to offer volunteer programs, of course. so the next few slides are about the budget and i want to have our colleague share with you more details >> good morning supervisors. oh, you switched it for me. i'm mark the cf o at the museum i want to cover some of the questions. so what you have in front of the you say a slide that represents our city revenue. you can look and see the increase year over year. the prim increase in the general fund is really a salary and benefit increase
names) >> thank you. item b presentations to the board of education. >> thank you president norton. every meeting gets better and better and better and better. and so good evening to everyone. i have many updates i'd like to share with our public and whew we made it to the end of the school year. another year. i have some good news we join withor parents and other school districts across california from sacramento regarding the state budget and local formula. i spoke about that. well, our budget will not increase but by 20/20 it will be $11,000 per student. it is cause for celebration that in the not too distant future our public funds are more consistent and the rest of the state catches up with the city and county of san francisco. in terms of the san francisco budget process tonight we'll have the first reading of our 2013 and 2014 budget. this is approximately $15,000 more for next year's budget. we've been working diligently and steadily to insure that all the exponents that need to work together to support students have what they need. the 2013, 2014 has bold changes. we will
different from voting in a typical election is that public education is at the center. the pb really functions as kind of a school of citizenship and democracy. what we've seen is that that education process both serves as the leadership development ground not only for new leaders people who have not been part of the leadership in the community but also to transform their understanding of their community. one of the things that we saw recently in the process in chicago to kind of illustrate what that public education looks like there was a public committee that wanted security cameras. they met with the local police department and the local 9-1-1 center and what they found was actually what would improve public safety wouldn't be security cameras but proved latin-american are that was an important thing to incorporate into their experience as delegates. someone else that gets to the question of our democracy. is that pb ingenders a kind of deeper democracy. not only are people who normally don't come out but they come out if there's two or three you million dollars to come out and sp
to asia. and asia has been an important part of the education system. and in fact, our business plan is near conclusion and part of which is to double it's school attendance in our museum. so for fiscal year 13 and fourteen we want to have major exhibitions. in the city department it's our job to share the values that we have that we can provided to all public and participate in the larger activities like the america's cup. then we'll have our final presentation with a magnificent demonstration from the korean arts. and there's a world-class and korean community has been very supportive it the museum like all aligning communities. and next spring we're going to have an indian arts and culture but may i say it's universal. everybody can identify with not only the physical experience but the deeply culture and spiral entertainment. then our wonderful center has closed with collaborating with a lot of folks so next summer it about gorgeous to explore different concepts of beauty and think that will be magnificent to enjoy and last by not at least we're going to introduce a road of arres
-rate increases on middle income students and families families who struggle most to afford a college education." >> i find it interesting that the white house is taken that proposal when they also propose that we tie the interest rates to the market. .nd the same market interest that work it can move up and down. we very carefully put in caps an in case you get a market rate where the interest rates are rising very rapidly. i think when you say something like "this is going to be the largest rise." that says you are predicting what market is going to do. i argue they do not know. >> a 10 -- your -- the 10-year treasury is 2.2. under your plan, rates would go to 4.7% under the president's plan it would go under it down a little bit to about 3.1% for this next lending year. what is your reason to increase rates right now on the subsidized stafford loans? >> by law they go to 6.8%. >> we have the current policy debate during the fiscal cliff. other current policy still would go up there. would it be a good idea to increase the rates? >> we are splitting hairs. the law says on july 1 they go to 6.
people, people that have blue- collar jobs. really, it is paramount and centered on education. for young people, making sure, ensuring we are providing them a quality education in public schools. i served as chair on the select committee, a committee between the members of the board of supervisors and members on the school board, coming together to address the challenges. in this particular case, we are talking about education. we are talking about a working- class community, the excelsior, the bayview, all of these different neighborhoods are smaller enclaves. we still see the same kinds of challenges. when the schools begin to perform a stellar academic programs, businesses will continue to relocate because the employees will want to live in san francisco and want kids to be educated here. it is a cyclical and symbiotic creation ship. another challenges that we have the highest unemployment rate in this part of san francisco. san francisco before, the numbers are starting to come down a little bit. we have high rates in the latter part of last year, but it is starting to -- it is start
with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and
offered around hysterically practices around the education services and supporting the achievement of african-american students were we attended the training that was on the restoring enforcement. we participated in to kind of broaden our prospective on how it pertains to engaging parents and also to look at exploring how we can support the work across the district. one of the experiences that stuck out was the exercise of looking at the parental engagement of the process is it token or is it real are participation. what we determined at the end of this exercise it depend upon on the attention whether the parents had a say in the design whether they determined the consent or where they to participate and sign off. and one of the topics that really graded the meeting was the process itself. for a lot of parents showing up it's a new experience. maybe they don't understand the language but depending upon how it's structured. so another piece that we participated in was part of participating in the implementation of the design special education and their identifying their straefg goal
with the departments and educate the public. excuse me. sf environment is a one shop stop to help to protect the environment locally. we develop much of the environment codes locally for the public >> i think your presentation will be up. so as requested i'll spend a few minutes talking about the housing environment arrest first is zero waste. we conduct the outreach on our proposition of incentives. we have the wait program that includes the implementation of the mandatory recycling ordinance and providing and monitoring cinnamons with the demolition. offer if you wouldn't mind activating the power point i think it's ready to go. along with dp w he set the rates for the various places in the city and spearhead other programs. a related program is around toxic reduction. it offers a variety of the public to expose of their toxic products. we provided information insuring with the least possible toxic products are used. we have the pest management plan for the property and we manage the safe disposal program and promote the hazard us home waste program. and also on this slide you'll see two
for a while, i had to stay home, i was thinking i would not be properly educated. the fear of not being properly educated or being illiterate, all of those fears were killing me. and then my father came in and said, do not be afraid, my child. success can only be achieved beyond fear. tavis: i have come to believe that we are who we are because somebody loved us. we are who we are because somebody loved us. it is clear your parents played a major role in your life. >> my parents were such loving parents. they were very young, my father was 24 and my mother was 20 when they married. i was their first child. you can imagine all of their love. they were spending so much time with me. ourrother keeps saying, parents never spent as much time with me. i told him i was the first child and i was loved and praised all the time. my mother told me she used to hug me and take me to the mirror and watch me in the mirror and think, thank god we are having a daughter. that is amazing. tavis: i am not surprised your mother felt that way. that yoururprised father felt that way about you. but you well kn
disabilities. for your education you'll be happy to go through the list or i can go through the list on your own of the various types of discrimination and classes. policy and social justice division. we had issued 9 resolutions and mitigated 4 issues. served as novrn profit issue hosts. we hosted education events and convened more than 1 hundred meetings and realized 10 or 11 i believe the number was 11 issues last year our major initiatives under the lgb advisory committee we're working on is the lgb aging policy task force. we facilitate that work group we facilitated and staffed that group. the lgb working horsing work group looking at discrepancies in the lgb community. the lgb youth group and looking at both the mission looking at the areas in this city that are not traditionally places for gaze and lesbians and we're looking at what services exist in those areas for non-traditionally populations. equity advisory committee we have a speaker series which goes around and don't education. we have a silver commission. we're talking about elders of color and their particular issues dealing
have our community arts and education program which oversees our four culture centers as well as two virtual collection center we have an antigraffiti program in a number of schools in the city as well as our internationally renowned that provides creativity services to students. we have our grants program which is a nationally renowned program that awards phone calls with a budget under a million dollars. for and by historically underserved contingent. the legislation has about that a national model for many arts counsels around the country to build the system. next, we have our civic design program. we have a city design review for all projects. we have our san francisco arts galleries program that reviews 3 areas. in the veterans war believe that will be close important a seismic project. and finally we have our street ar artists majority of our budget is through general funds. we have a number of resources on departmental work orders like the public library and the public works department. they primarily support our art program and antigraffiti program. under the license fees we
at the use of illegal drugs your point again not for legalization or say but for education and you talk about the idea that people should know what's in a psychoactive drug before they get involved. and one of your arguments that i found estimating his most people who use illegal drugs are not addicts by your tip definition and it doesn't interfere with parenting and with worker with relationships. i think most americans if they heard this they would say but doc or hart you are taking away all of the hype and the fear that we want our children to hear that it might be better to say to children don't do drugs. even if your argument is chew their people who do illegal drugs and don't suffer consequences. why is it better given what you said about the police in networks of crime that had been attached, why wouldn't you say it's better to say to kids don't do drugs? >> guest: well for one i'm a professor so one of the things i think is more important is to teach people how to think. when you say don't do drugs or just say no, there is no thinking going on. now if you have a curious kid which you
success in america. now when you look at the use of illegal drugs coming you're point again, for education, and you talk about the idea that people should know what's in a cycle active drug before they get involved, and one of your argument that i found fascinating is most people who use illegal drugs are not at that, it doesn't interfere with parenting or work or relationships. i think most americans if they heard this they would say but dr. hart, you are taking away all of the - and here we want our kids to fear and it might be better to say don't do drugs. they don't do drugs and suffer consequences why isn't it a better given what you said the police and the networks of crime that then attached why wouldn't you say. >> guest: i am a professor and one of the things i think is most important is to teach people how to think and so when you say don't do drugs or just say no, there is no sort of thinking going on. now if you have a curious kid which you would hope you would have. my issue is why not give the kid the proper education? so if they choose to indulge, many will not but if they d
again not for the legalization per say, but for education and you talk about the idea that people should know what is in a cycle active drug before they get involved. and one of your arguments i found fascinating is people that use them on not addict by your definition a dozen that year with parenting and work or relationships. i think most americans if they heard this they would say that carl hart coming you are taking away all of the hype and fear that we want our children to year. it might be better to see children don't do drugs. even if your argument is true, there are people who do illegal drugs and don't suffer the consequences, why isn't it better get in when you said about the network of crimes that then attach why wouldn't you say it's better to say to kids don't do drugs? >> guest: i am a professor so one of things important is to teach people how to think. when you say don't do drugs or just say no, there is no sort of thinking going on. now if you have a curious kid, what you would hope your kid would be curious for themselves and so my issue is why not give the kid the prop
slice of school vouchers, and it's basically a long-term agenda of how to privatize public education. and this was not our issue area. so i started asking friends, "who can i talk to about school choice and school vouchers?" and everybody pointed to julie. >> bill moyers: julie underwood, attorney and professor of education at the university of wisconsin. >> julie underwood: i've done education policy for a long time, and many times said people are trying to defund and dismantle public education, but i'd never put all of these forces together, until i saw all of those documents. the kind of changes that alec is trying to impose on public education isn't really just mild reform, it's actually creating a drastically different kind of educational system than what we have now. >> bill moyers: alec describes itself as a non-partisan partnership of state legislators, members of the private sector and the general public, devoted to limited government, free enterprise, and jeffersonian principles. founded close to 40 years ago, it produces what it calls "model legislation" - proposed laws th
have a full education department we have 16 teaching artists that go out into the schools. we have touched over a thousand school kids this year and we've had over 1 thousand and 50 something coming to our dress rehearsals mark your calendar for november 8th. it will be the high school night and we would love to have you there. and on july 7th we will have the best training program in the world. and not only that i will leave with you the schools that we were in last year and i hope to have the new schedule ready once. as soon as september and ask you to please attend the schools in your district. please support the arts. >> thank you. next speaker, please >> hello, i'm a high school teacher in the unified san francisco district. i've been teaching 13 years and at the high school for 10 years that you are currently i'm leading a project with the theatre. and without this my ask the wouldn't have be able to graduate this year for it's the foundation of our curriculum is project learn. our students represent the south east community from the - our students are faced with adult cha
: it was everywhere even to how the participants educate children. their principal of education educating their children teach them how to obey. [speaking mandarin chinese] >> translator: even if i had any thoughts, any disagreement in my mind disagreement with the government in my mind admitted feel the fear, and i would stop -- [inaudible] >> so there came a point when you realize that something very, very bad happened in china's past, this famine, and you started to realize that things had been very bad, very wrong, were you afraid to bring this -- write this book? [speaking mandarin chinese] >> translator: i had a sense of danger. in my explanation of erecting this "tombstone" for myself. yes, i had -- [speaking mandarin chinese] >> translator: if i written the book thirty years ago, i wouldn't be here. i would have been executed. [speaking mandarin chinese] >> translator: if i had written the book twenty years ago, i had would have been jailed. [speaking mandarin chinese] >> translator: i'm not facing execution or jail time, there's a fear of being marginalized and persecuted. >> tha
. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to
two and three and beyond have access to an excellent public education? that sets them up for the careers of tomorrow and opportunities for tomorrow as well. consider me a thought partner; and all my colleagues as well, will be happy to have a conversation with you. thank you. apl (applause)>> my name is -- prieto, resident of district 2, i am on behalf of the groundswell of people objecting to the commercialization of -- on marina green as part of the revenue stream for rec and parks. people may have not noticed that every other week some type sporting event or out there event is taking place in that vicinity, it generates enough revenue as it is. we believe this restaurant will set another precedent regarding chaining the shoreline. for the supervisor and the mayor we hope that the legacy will be one where you preserve the open space and shore line, instead of building a restaurant on seismically unsound foundation. thank you. (applause) >> good morning everyone. my name is -- and i'm a student here at galileo. i'm here to talk about my education as well as the
show up to remove invasive species and trash and also fund and lead their own environmental education program at pier 94. one of the components of the port's habitat improvement program is revegetation of the adjacent upland area. we have endeavored to establish native grasses and coastal scrub species. you can see the substrate, hard-pack gravel unsuitable to support plant life and our efforts did not succeed. six years on, the golden gate audubon society again sought their own funding to revegetate that area. the white boundary shows the perimeter of that area. they will place a better quality soil that can support that life. soil placement is underway now; we expected to be completed this summer and the planting will continue in phases over the next couple of years. further south lies heron's head park, the largest and most accessible and best-known habitat enhancement project, at the southern end of the port's jurisdiction just north of the former hunter's point power plant in south of pier 96. heron's head park is an irregularly shaped peninsula, from the air, is formed in t
for the community that need my help. i am an architect by education. i spent time in the neighborhood. i director of housing for the city of atlanta empowerment agency. i been around. i been around. so i do not like what i see when i drive down third street. it don't make me feel good. if any of y'all drive third street and feel good? i say this is not the place for you. thank you. >> i want to thank you mayor. you know this is my community. espinola jackson, dr. espinola jackson's community. and when i raise my hand for them to pick up if one wants to have something to say. i had my hand in the air first, i don't know how i got behind. i ran behind for the speakers, they don't know the services we have in this building here in this community college. we have second language here, and no one should be ignored. everything was talked about except aids prevalent here in bayview hunter's point. we want to see a change in that and also in education, transportation. we have turk out in this community. our young people cannot go to school unless they are jumped upon. this needs to be stopped. and only y
the comfort in areas that are corner stone for economic in the country. i'm talking about education, infrastructure, arts and culture. how does the technology help us continue so we don't see this as the bubble that some people continue to expect it, but to see it as the foundation for economic recovery and expansion all across the country. i will be very interested in the topics, not only covering those parts of the format but also areas of immigration, public safety, thing s that i know technology employees want to have housing to make it more affordable for all of you that live and stay here. the big secret is, if you keep the talent, those interested living in the city, then the jobs will be here, the expansion jobs will be here. if you spend time in education, not only will you have greater work force, you will have a work force sustaining for future. i'm working on all that that. all of these will be part of the new york summit that new york will sponsor and in september, that will be right part of our innovation month. in early 2014 we'll have a similar event hosted here in s
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particul
college education, john. come on. >> leave that out of thi >> i want to know how they did that snooping when thereas two cans on either end. was there a third can we didn't see in the middle of that le? but in a event, you know, jonas made a good point about the productivity. but you know, what he didn't mention is thathopping ov the intnet -- i want to come back to this e-comrce point -- is a way of impving our productivity. 1 of the people out there said you know what? i'm sick of the spying stuff. i dotrust the internet any longer. i'm no going to buy something on ebay or on amazon. i'm going to have to get in my car and drive to the mall. oh, my gosh. how many peopl aravoiding the hours you spend doing that, avoid spending the gasoline? significant impact.ve a >> but gary, what is somebody doing online when they're buying something that has anything to do with spying or anything to do with terrorism? if you're afraid of that, i'd be much more afraid of going to a restaurant with my credit card and having the wait or waitress swipe my cret card. it's only happened about ten times >>
. >> reporter: whatever money isn't spent on food he spends here to pay for bibky's education. >> he had a dream. he says he would like his brother to go to school. he doesn't want his brother to be in the mines. >> reporter: like their father, like pemba, whose other wish is to save up enough money to leave this place by the time he's 25. that means eight more years of climbing down into the darkness of the rat holes. i'm bob woodruff for "nightline" in northeast india. >> education is the light at the end of that tunnel. thanks to bob woodruff. and coming up next, the beauty queen blunder heard round the world. and why the masses go mad for public failure. uh-oh! guess what day it is?? guess what day it is! huh...anybody? julie! hey...guess what day it is?? ah come on, i know you can hear me. mike mike mike mike mike. ha ha ha ha ha ha! leslie, guess what today is? it's hump day. whoot whoot! ronny, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? i'd say happier than a camel on wednesday. hump day!!! yay!! get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percen
to improve education, healthcare, and entrepreneurship are crossed the grove -- across the globe. we are wanting to address the topic of what american policymakers should do to respond to this revolution. where will we get more spectrum to use applications and what can the public and private sectors due to stimulate greater education and investment in mobile technology. to help us understand these issues, we have two outstanding speakers, one of whom is here. the second one will be arriving and i will introduce him when he arrives shortly. we are pleased to welcome randall stephenson to brookings. this is the ceo of at&t. since becoming chairman he has transformed the company into a global leadership position in mobile internet services and ip- based business communications solutions. under his leadership, at&t has to radically expanded its wireless business and enhanced its advanced enterprise tape abilities. the company has expanded its fast-growing form for integrated television data and voice services. at&t has initiated the largest education initiative in the company's history.
's do to more settings. unfortunately, the state doesn't see to backfill the education cuts and that's not helping our situation either. >> the tier 3 resources were a topic of discussion. you've already seen those numbers. and then in terms of next steps so what we hopefully, we will hear tonight and in the next several days is comments or questions from the commissioners. and we will be in lincoln mode tonight. we're happy to try to answer the questions i have but i think just to make a suggestion for you to consider next week's discussion a dedicated discussion but if the commissioners time to think about your questions or share them outside the meeting so we can be perpetrate to address them and prepare accordingly to next week's meeting. on june 18th we think the mayor will have signed the budget. wherever the budget is infected we feel like we'll have a good sense of what's in that budget. but we all in cases after the board adopted the budget we look at the assumptions from the statewide budget and recommended additions to the budget. the schools receive their final budgets i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,131 (some duplicates have been removed)